Deadly arrhythmias, mutations, ion channels, and integrative modelling, February 16, 13.00 hours

On February 16, at 13.00 hours in the Advanced Medical and Pharmaceutical Research Center Conference Room the lecture entitled “Deadly arrhythmias, mutations, ion channels, and integrative modelling” will be presented by Dr. Georges Christé, Researcher at the Animalerie Zebrafish of the Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University in Lyon, France

Short description of the presentation: Malignant cardiac arrhythmias are a concern for any clinician throughout the world. Genetic predisposition, acting through single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or through actual causative mutations, is one of the factors involved in the genesis of these arrhythmias. Our group in Lyon (France) discovered and characterized in human patients several mutations in genes encoding for ion channels (hERG, HCN4, connexins) and transcription factors (PITX2). Over the time, we have used analyses at several levels – genomics, mRNA expression analysis, protein synthesis and functional analysis (patch-clamp) – in both human patients and animals with experimentally-induced mutations, to evaluate the role of these mutations in the arrhythmias found in human patients. Recently, we gained new and important insights into ECG recording in the Zebrafish, in which we designed a signal-based template recognition of ECG waves.

Short biography of the lecturer –Dr. Georges Christé, Researcher at the Animalerie Zebrafish of the Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University in Lyon, France

Initially trained in Prof. Oger Rougier's laboratory at the Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University in Lyon, France, Dr. Christé, INSERM researcher since 1984, started his activity studying electrophysiological phenomena in the frog atrial trabecles, the role of Na+ ions, of Molsidomine and of electric shocks on excitation-contraction coupling. During his PhD, Dr. Christé focused on the effects of cardiac glycosides on the electrical and mechanical activity of human atrial and ventricular myocardium. Later on, he studied the effects of Metformin and Propafenone on the IK-ATP channels in ventricular myocytes in the rabbit. Over the past decade, Dr. Christé focused on the role of the transverse-axial tubular system (TATS) on ventricular myocytes, both experimentally and using mathematical modelling. Recently, Dr. Christé became interested in the role of ion channel mutations in cardiac arrhythmias using both experimental and theoretical approaches. Lately, he became interested in performing ECG recordings in the Zebrafish, improving the recording system and generating a signal-based template recognition of ECG waves.

 

See you there!